The Authority identified several key infrastructure issues in its annual reports to the legislature.

• A significant gap exists between infrastructure needs and available funding via either grants or loans

• Incentives should be provided to encourage utilities to become more proactive in the management and financing of their systems

• State grant and loan funds may not be reaching the most economically distressed communities

To address these issues, the Authority initiated fundamental changes to the state’s approach to assistance with water infrastructure funding through: EXPANDING ACCESS TO CAPITAL

• Simplified the application process across all five funding programs administered by the Division of Water Infrastructure

• Developed a strategic, comprehensive priority rating system to evaluate the best use of limited state funds

• Refined the criteria for project affordability to increase access to low-cost or no-cost capital by economically distressed utilities that already have high water or sewer rates


WFRF is dedicated to finding affordable and sustainable

solutions for the aging water infrastructure crisis.

Studies and Reports


ClickHERE to download the CMMS Study.

INCENTIVIZING UTILITY MANAGEMENT
• Created a new grant program to allow a utility to develop an inventory of its water and wastewater infrastructure, assess the condition of the assets and prioritize capital needs to address the most critical issues (Asset Inventory and Assessment grant) 
• Created a new grant program to allow utilities to study the feasibility of merging or regionalizing with other systems (Merger/Regionalization Feasibility grant)


FOCUSING ON ECONOMICALLY DISTRESSED UTILITIES

• Identified the factors that struggling utilities may face, such as small customer bases and potential organizational and/or financial management issues that may limit access to capital.

WFRF is dedicated to finding affordable and sustainable

solutions for the aging water infrastructure crisis.

The United States and Canada face tremendous capital outlays to repair and replace aging municipal and utility infrastructure. Technology is required to better manage the complex decision-making process for maintenance, operational and capital investments and resource allocation. This study originally conducted in 2012 and updated in 2014-2015 and initially published in 2016 comprises a comparative review of the major computerized maintenance management and infrastructure asset management systems used by municipal governments and water and wastewater utilities in the United States and Canada. A confidential independent review of the study was also conducted. The objective of this study is to provide municipal elected officials, public works directors, infrastructure asset managers, maintenance managers, information technology managers, finance directors and procurement staff an overview of municipal maintenance management and infrastructure asset management software in a comparative format in preparation for a request for qualifications or proposals. The comparative criteria include software costs, vendor services, support, specialization, work orders, inventory control, licensing and permitting, condition assessment, risk management, asset inventory, GIS mapping, Esri GIS integration, 311 systems, mobile devices, Esri GIS ROI and future industry trends. The cost factor and price considerations remain the same from the 2012 study and was not updated in the 2014-2015 research period. The comparative analysis of core maintenance management and infrastructure asset management functions was completed for the following 14 software systems in alphabetic order: Accela, Agile Assets, Azteca System’s Cityworks, Cartegraph, Cityview, Energov, IBM’s Maximo, Infor/Hansen, Lucity/GBA, Maintenance Connection, Novotx’s Elements, Oracle, Pubworks and Vueworks. 


Abstract:

Download the Report  HERE.

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WFRF is dedicated to finding affordable and sustainable

solutions for the aging water infrastructure crisis.

BEST EXAMPLE OF STATE LEVEL PARTICIPATION IN ADDRESSING WATER INFRASTRUCTURE AND FUNDING ISSUES.